Bibliography - Science - A new solar system has been discovered in which they are looking for unknown life

Bibliography – Science – A new solar system has been discovered in which they are looking for unknown life

The two planets orbit a small, cool star called LP 890–9. The second coolest star is TRAPPISTDimension 1. One of the planets in the system is LP 890It is known as 9b and is only 30 percent larger than Earth. It is so close to this wonderful star that a year takes only 2.7 days.

The solar system also contains another completely unknown planet, which scientists have dubbed LP 890His name was 9 c. This planet is similar in size to Planet One – 40 percent larger than Earth – but takes longer to orbit the star in one year, 8.5 days.

A planet lies within the habitable zone

The new research was carried out using ground-based telescopes called Speculoos – to search for habitable planets around very cold stars. ll is 890Very cool stars like 9 require these types of follow-up observations because space telescopes have a hard time detecting them.

Scientists have begun new observations in hopes of confirming the existence of the first planet, spotted by NASA’s Transit Exoplanet Survey Satellite, which is searching for planets outside the solar system, according to reports. does not depend on. However, the second planet was also found during the observations.

The latter planet lies within the star’s “habitable zone,” which means it’s neither too hot nor too cold for alien life.

The habitable zone is the concept that the surface temperature of a planet with Earth-like geological and atmospheric conditions would allow water to remain liquid for billions of years.

– said Amaury Triaud, professor of exoplanet research at the University of Birmingham and chair of the Speculoos working group that plans the observations leading to the discovery of the second planet.

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