Trump begged and threatened over the phone to find another 11,780 votes

Trump begged and threatened over the phone to find another 11,780 votes

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By The Washington Post mentioned According to podcasts and a report, there was an hour-long conversation between Trump and his Republican counterpart Brad Ravensberger, Georgia’s state secretary of state. Trump alternated flattery, pleading, and mysterious criminal consequences that threatened the Ravensburger in an attempt to reverse the outcome of the Georgia election, which brought Biden a short victory.

According to the newspaper, Ravensburger rejected Trump’s claims and told the president that the elections were fair, the results are accurate, and he relied on conspiracy theories.

“Georgia is angry, its people are angry,” Trump was quoted by the Post newspaper as saying. “And there’s nothing wrong with saying, you know, I’ve recalculated the votes.”

And there’s nothing wrong with saying, you know, you’ve recalculated.

“I just want to find 11,780 votes because we won the state,” Trump said in the recording, insisting that he could not lose the state election in any way.

None of those involved wanted Reuters’ response to the recording, published by the Washington Post.

Meanwhile, 10 Democratic and Republican senators issued a statement calling on federal lawmakers to confirm the outcome of the November presidential election, which said Democratic Party Joe Biden had defeated Republican Donald Trump in office.

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The President was officially elected in December by the so-called Electoral College, whose members cast their votes in every state based on the winner there, and which must be approved by a joint meeting of both houses of Congress, the federal legislature. This vote will take place next Wednesday. If both a senator and a member object to a state vote, the House and Senate must have a separate debate and vote on whether the objection is upheld. Several Republican lawmakers indicated this week they would file an objection, and on Saturday they were joined by dozens of Republican senators as well, including influential Texas politician Ted Cruz.

In a bipartisan statement on Sunday joined by four Republican senators, including former presidential candidate Mitt Romney, politicians wrote that those who want to reverse the election outcome are against the apparent will of the American people and their sole aim is to undermine Americans’ confidence in an already scheduled election result. . “It is time to move forward,” the senators wrote in a statement.

Mitch McConnell, the leader of the Republican majority in the Senate, this week asked her fellow parties not to object to the election result, and other senators criticized their party mates preparing to vote against the election result. Senator Ben Sassi of Nebraska said questioning the outcome “hurts the party and hurts the country.” (Reuters / MTI)

Cover photo: Shutterstock

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