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Spending on Valentine's Day boosts business and the economy

Spending on Valentine's Day boosts business and the economy

Tell me the details: From family-run flower farms in Washington state to small chocolate-making businesses in Arkansas, American businesses bring this special day to life for families, couples, and Galentines across the country.

Economic impact: Valentine's Day is more than just cards and candy, it's a time when Americans show the special people in their lives how much they mean to them, and it's brought to consumers by American businesses.

As kids start writing and stamping their Valentine's cards and couples make dining reservations, businesses are in full swing to provide Americans with the perfect gift or experience to make their day special.

Valentine's Day is an economic driver

The holiday is an economic driver for businesses of all types in communities across the country.

  • National Retail Federation (NRF) Estimates 53% of consumers plan to celebrate Valentine's Day $25.8 billion It will be spent on the holiday this year, or about $185.81 per household.

Highest spending on Valentine's Day: It's no surprise that chocolate and other sweets reign supreme on Valentine's Day, with candy accounting for 57% of Valentine's Day spending.

Whether purchased from a local florist, flower delivery service, or neighborhood grocery store, flowers remain an integral part of the Valentine's Day holiday.

  • American Florists Association Reports 250 million roses They are prepared alone by American florists for Valentine's Day, with Cupid being the number one holiday for florists and flower buyers.

Restaurants and retail see a spike on Valentine's Day

Dining out also represents a larger portion of consumer spending on Valentine's Day.

  • National Restaurant Association He tells the chamber they expect 60 million adults will go out to a restaurant for a special meal on Valentine's Day this year.
  • Additionally, 35 million adults are expected to order takeout or delivery from a restaurant for a special Valentine's Day meal at home, consisting of either the full meal or portions of the meal.

  • Are you looking for last minute deals? National Restaurant Association Nearly 40% of Americans report Celebrate Valentine's Day after the fact to get a better deal, so look for restaurants offering deals and specials a few days after February 14.

Retail is also seeing an uptick on Valentine's Day, including the jewelry and apparel industries, which plan to see a record $6.4 billion in spending and $3 billion in sales this holiday. respectively.

Chocolate Chocolate Based in Washington, D.C., it has been offering customers Valentine's Day treats and treats since 1984, and has grown into a beloved shop in the nation's capital.

  • From the first Valentine's Day in 1984 to today, the traffic the store receives each year is a testament to the store's dedication to crafting personalized treats and gifts for everyone who walks through its doors.

  • “We want to stay small because we want to be out there,” said Ginger Park, who owns the chocolate company with her sister, Frances. “I own the business but I also pack boxes behind the counter because that's what I love to do.”

The Big Picture

All this spending adds to economic opportunities for businesses of all sizes. Using survey data from the NRF, the Chamber calculated the economic impact of Valentine's Day in more than 300 metro areas across the country. Learn about the potential impact in your area.

How has your city been affected?

Using data from the National Retail Federation, the chamber calculated how much consumers would spend in all 386 U.S. metro areas. Track spending in our searchable database.

minimum: On Valentine's Day, Cupid's arrows not only pierce hearts, but also increase economic activity. As families and lovebirds embrace the spirit of the day, industries from chocolatiers to retailers are feeling the love, reminding us that even Cupid knows the value of a good business deal.

About the authors

Nicholas Molinari

Nicholas Molinari is coordinator of the health, economic, and tax policy teams at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

Read more

Rachel Leadbeater

Rachel Leadbeater

Rachel Ledbetter is senior director of communications and strategy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

Read more

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