Researchers have found the remains of the largest fish lizard ever known

Researchers have found the remains of the largest fish lizard ever known

Researchers at the University of Bonn have discovered, among other things, the tooth of a giant ichthyosaur in the Alps of Graubünden in Switzerland, possibly the largest reptile from around 200 million years ago.



The German researchers also retrieved details from the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, which describe the rootstock of the found tooth having a diameter of 6 inches, and by far the most common fish lizard tooth ever found. In addition to many other information about the size of the tooth, the size and length of the animal can also be determined afterwards.

The researchers are not yet sure whether the root size of a tooth is directly proportional to height, since in previous research many primate fish lizards had no teeth at all, and their victims had just been sucked and then digested. In addition to the teeth, ribs and vertebrae were also found, and it is also certain that the sediments in which the remains were found can be clearly traced back to the Triassic period.

Excavations in the Swiss mountains as a result of That can also be said The size of the backbone of an ichthyosaur that has been found to rival the largest fossil reptile known to date. Fish lizards have a size of more than 20 meters and have existed for more than 250 million years, and 95% of marine species disappeared as a result of the Permian extinction.

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