Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

science

Christian faith and science are compatible – testified the world-famous Hungarian Benedictine physicist

Christian faith and science are compatible – testified the world-famous Hungarian Benedictine physicist

A conference about Jáky Szaniszló, one of Hungary's most famous scientists, was held over the weekend in Győr, at the Benedictine High School. “Benedictine monk Jáky Szaniszló is one of the most influential Hungarian geniuses of the 20th century. Aleteia, one of the most prestigious English-language Catholic magazines, ranked him among the five most influential Catholic scholars in world history. – One of the speakers at the conference, Miklos Pojranj Lovaas, senior researcher at the Center for Fundamental Rights, told Mandiner.hu.

As he explained: The series of historical events called the Enlightenment succeeded in spreading the prejudice that religion is not a rational phenomenon and that therefore we should leave God out of rational interpretation of the world. Jaki Szanieszlo's easy-to-understand writings are well suited to become compulsory reading in universities, but also for the most demanding high school graduates, and thus convincingly refute this proposition,

Pointing out that faith and science are very compatible.

Miklos Pograny Lovas added: When Jaki Szaniszló died, he was remembered by the Pontifical Church Academy, the world's leading universities, but also the liberal New York Times, as well as conservative think tanks. The Benedictine monk's American career was evaluated by Russell Kirk himself, the great conservative thinker. Jackie's first American book was published by the University of Chicago Press, a bastion of the conservative movement.

Father Szanieszlo eventually became a frequent author for popular political journals (Modern Era, Intercollegiate Review, and Chesterton Review) and think tanks (Institute for Intercollegiate Studies) under the name Stanley L. Jackie. Since then, he has been regarded in political conservative and religious Catholic circles.

See also  The need for Yakuza 6 is not so dangerous, and it can be done with your little finger

The conference was organized from February 9 to 10 by the Research Group on Religion and Science at the University of Szczenzi István in Győr and Szent Mór Bencés Perjelség at the Gergely Bencés High School in Czuczor, where Jáki Szaniszló graduated in 1942. One of the most famous Benedictine theologians of the 20th century is also Honorary citizen of Gyor.

The conference concluded on the afternoon of February 10 in Pannonhalma, where a wreath was laid on the grave of Father Jaecki Szanieszlo in the crypt of the Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, the resting place of Benedictine monks, and then a Holy Mass was offered for his soul. It is in the main basilica of the monastery.

“We are pleased that, even in comparison with scientific conferences, we were able to address a very large number of speakers in many fields of science, from theology to philosophy, physics, literature and biology, in relation to the works of Jaki Szanieszló and to further consider his works.

The highlight of the conference was a concert by pianist Gergely Boganyi, rich with personal memories, on Friday evening.

Throughout his life, the famous historian of science, philosopher of science, physicist and theologian, university professor studied the relationship between faith and science in his works. He declared what St. Paul preached that we should have reasonable faith. He believed that faith and science could be reconciled. There are parts of the natural sciences that even scientists cannot answer, and I think this is where the role of faith and religion in everyone's life comes into play. – Kelemen Sárai-Szabó slash remembered According to Gyor Plusz.

See also  There are still three places to rent in the ProSuli Student Robotics Competition

High school teacher Gergely Bognar, who was the professional organizer of the conference, confirmed: “The primary purpose of this event is to interest the legacy of Jacky Szanieszlo. The relationship between religion and the natural sciences is still of great importance today. Many misunderstandings and misconceptions arise in this regard, both in everyday public discourse and in friendly conversations. Through interest in the works of Jackie, the lectures help us clarify and see these questions better.

Jackie Saniszlo Born in 1924 in Gyor. He entered the Benedictine order in 1942, and was ordained a priest in Pannonhalma in 1948. He studied in Rome, and after the partial dissolution of the Hungarian monastic order, he moved to the United States, where he had a serious vocation. He received his doctorate in physics in 1957. He taught at Princeton University and lectured as a guest lecturer at Yale, Oxford and many other famous universities. His first major scientific book was The Horizon of Physics, published by the University of Chicago Press in 1966, in which he discussed the importance of medieval religiosity and medieval science. He also won the Templeton Prize for his scientific work in 1987, which is one of the most important scientific awards. In the early 1990s, he donated a large portion of the prize money to build the new dormitory of Czuczor Gergely Bencés High School. He has published more than forty books. He died in Madrid in 2009. His brother was the well-known musicologist, collector of folk songs and csángo scholar Father Teodos Jacqui, and Father Zeno Jacqui, principal of the large Benedictine high school in Bannonhalm and Györ.

See also  Index - Science - It's not a fairy tale if we always live in the same day

The conference was opened by Josef Bokor, Vice President responsible for Research and Innovation at Istvan Széchenyi University. Franciscan Agoston Baginski, lecturer at the Sapientia College of Religious Studies, spoke among others; Balazs Mizzi, Corvinus Professor of Philosophy; Zsolt Hitese, Senior Researcher in Science at the Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Pécs; Attila Zombath, Philosophy Teacher Pazmani, Associate Professor; Zoltan Vrenjö, Hungarian Research Network philosopher; And many other things.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You May Also Like

Top News

In a harrowing incident that has shaken the community of Lewiston, Maine, a series of shootings on Wednesday evening resulted in a tragic loss...

Top News

President Joe Biden’s abrupt departure from a speech on the U.S. economy at the White House on Monday sent a ripple of speculation and...

Tech

A dangerous application appeared in the Apple App Store disguised as a known program. 24.hu reported the Based on TechCrunch article. Dangerous app in...

World

Chinese scientists have discovered a little-known type of ore containing a rare earth metal highly sought after for its superconducting properties. The ore, called...

Copyright © 2024 Campus Lately.