A highly contagious version of bird flu has emerged on another poultry farm in southern England

A highly contagious version of bird flu has emerged on another poultry farm in southern England

Another case of highly pathogenic bird flu has been confirmed in Devon, with more than 90 cases recorded in England alone.

A highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza was confirmed on Wednesday (April 13) at a second site near St Mary’s in Tidburn, citing Defra (UK Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs). Farming

All birds at the affected site were humanely killed and a 3 km protection zone and a 10 km observation zone were established around the site.

There have been 92 cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza in the UK since the end of October 2021, the start of the winter avian influenza season.

Kristen Middlemis The chief veterinarian has drawn the attention of farmers and backyard rangers to continue adhering to biosecurity measures.

“We have taken rapid action to limit the spread of the disease, including introducing animal husbandry measures. Whether they are keeping only a few birds or thousands, owners now need to be vigilant to protect their animals from this highly contagious disease.”

He added: “The avian influenza epidemic is not over yet, and increased commitment to biosecurity measures remains important.”

“Continue to clean and disinfect your shoes and clothing regularly before entering the enclosures, make sure your animals do not mix with wild birds and only accept absolutely essential visitors.”

He pointed out that it is mainly up to animal breeders to protect their birds from this dangerous disease.

Meanwhile, the laboratory of the National Office of Food Chain Safety in Hungary also confirmed the presence of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus in a fattening farm of about 3,500 individuals in Pax-Kiskun county.

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