Scientists have converted radio signals from Venus' atmosphere into sound

30 years later, NASA once again launched a mission to study Venus, not even one

After the Mars flight, NASA is targeting another planet: the US space agency will study Earth’s other neighbor, Venus, expected at the end of the decade. After about thirty years, two missions will begin immediately: DAVINCI + and VERITAS. With the help of missions, researchers will try to discover how the planet’s dense atmosphere developed and why Venus differs from neighboring Earth. (Source: IGN)

Most recently, an American mission to Venus was launched in 1989, when the surface of the planet was studied for 4 years using the Magellan spacecraft. NASA Administrator Bill Nelson says there is no set time yet for new missions to begin. “The point of both missions is to understand how Venus became a hellish place on whose surface lead melts,” Nelson said. “We hope that the missions will also help us better understand how the Earth formed and why our planet is habitable compared to other planets in the solar system.” Venus may once have been much more similar to Earth than it is today, and there may have been water on its surface.

The atmosphere of Venus, also known as the sister planet of Earth, is very high in carbon dioxide, and due to the greenhouse effect, the temperature on the rocky planet is higher than on Mercury, which is closest to the Sun, almost 500 degrees Celsius.

VERITAS’ main mission will be to map the surface of Venus and will begin a year after DAVINCI+, whose mission is scheduled to begin in 2029. VERITAS will launch with equipment that’s supposed to be “a hundred times more accurate” than Magellan, so it can provide more accurate topographic data. on the surface of the planet. DAVINCI+’s primary goal is to study the planet’s atmosphere and capture high-resolution images of Venus. However, we still have to wait a few years for this, in the meantime we can take a look at this year’s NASA image of Mars:

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